Ambulance Today – Spring Edition 2018

The Spring Edition for 2018, has hit the shelves, its live now in Ambulance Today. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 40, where I ask the question:

Can we Develop the Ideal Emergency Medicine Response System in Africa?

Ambulance Today – Spring Edition 2018

Besides the above article, the magazine is littered with so many other good reads – from Children in the ambulance – How do paramedics go about psychosocial care? , Volutape: solving the ventilator setting problem for critical patients, NAEMT Education: Helping to Improve Patient Outcomes in the Field and Letter from Amsterdam: Till death do us part.

To all the followers of this page, if you want to see an article written about any specific aspect of Emergency Care on the African continent, or get me to interview a key role player, drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you are enjoying this journey, as we continue to explore this fascinating continent. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate – Enjoy!

EMS – The Cost ……

An EMS colleague of mine posted this picture the other day ….

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All I can can say … is that losing a patient takes away apart of you, you can never get back. I wrote an article on this entitled:

EMS – You Can Never Leave

For those who ask this question, to those of us who work in EMS … take a read … and ponder awhile, at the of the cost of care. To my colleagues who keep going back to do the same … thank you ….

Cover image courtesy of:  © 2011-2017 DanSun PhotoArt

 

Ambulance Today – Winter Edition

The Winter Edition has hit the shelves, its live now in Ambulance Today. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 33, where I discuss the challenges facing emergency medicine educators in The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) – ‘From the Africa Desk’ by the Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

Ambulance Today – Winter Edition 2017

Besides the above article the magazine is littered with so many other good reads – from Infection Control to Technology in Medicine, Spinal Care and Identifying the Right Care for Older Patients.

To all the followers of this page, if you want to see an article written about any specific aspect of Emergency Care on the African continent, or get me to interview a key role player, drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you are enjoying the start of this journey, as we continue to explore this fascinating continent. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate, and for those who are privileged enough to spend time with their families over this holiday period – Enjoy!

Ambulance Today – Autumn Edition

The Autumn Edition has hit the shelves, its live now in Ambulance Today. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 37, An Introduction into the Aero-medical Evacuation Industry in Africa – ‘From the Africa Desk’ by the Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

Ambulance Today Autumn Edition 2017

To all the followers of this page, if you want to see an article written about any specific aspect of Emergency Care on the African continent, or get me to interview a key role player, drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you are enjoying the start of this journey, as we continue to explore this fascinating continent. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate.

Ambulance Today 1st Article

My first article is now live in Ambulance Today in their Summer 2017 edition. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 57. It will be a quarterly article – ‘From the Africa Desk’ by the new Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

Ambulance Today Summer Edition 2017

P57. From the Africa Desk of Ambulance Today Ambulance Today introduces our new segment ‘From the Africa Desk’ by our Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

To all the medical people who follow this page, if you have any ideas for special feature articles on ambulance and emergency care care in any part of Africa drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact. I am already busy on my next article outline … so stay in touch to follow our journey across this amazing continent.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you will walk this continent with me as we delve deeper into the respective regions in future articles. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate.

Feeling Proud

Feeling very proud at present, I am embarking on another new writing adventure, I have been appointed as the Africa editor for the UK based EMS publication – Ambulance Today, circulation includes, Europe, Canada, the Pacific Rim and now Africa.

At Ambulance Today we are always looking to expand our ambulance news coverage to different parts of the globe, which is why we are proud to launch our new segment ‘From the Africa Desk’ and introduce our Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

The Africa Quarterly editorial, that I will be writing, will cover the main regions in Africa, with opinion pieces from various regional role players. Our focus will be on the key regions across the continent; East, West, Central, Sub Sahara and North Africa. I will explore key and relevant NGO’s and the vital role that they play in bringing medicine and emergency medicine to the continent. The first article will be in the Summer Edition (UK Summer), which is in the next week 🙂

To all the medical people who follow this page, if you have any ideas for special feature articles on ambulance care in any part of Africa drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like  us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you will walk this continent with me as we delve deeper into the respective regions in future articles. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate.

My New Facebook Page :)

Greetings to all my gentle readers and avid followers. For those of you who have a love for poetry, poems, creative writing and life, please visit my new facebook page – by clicking on the link below:

Michael D Emmerich – Poet & Writer

This wordpress page will still feature all my new poems and creative writing articles and will also feed through to the new facebook page. The new page will be a more interactive way of following my writing and poetry; plus as I plan on publishing my poetry anthology this year, it will be a way to order copies (or find out where to purchase online) and get info on readings etc… Thanks for all the support and messages of encouragement over the past year.

Creativity is life🙂

PS: been working on more than a few poems, which will be posted shortly 🙂

 

 

Courage Under Fire

an absence of fear

the ability to suppress

or maybe

there are values of more import

grace, valour, hope



bear defeat

never lose heart

remain calm

capture courage

push on

get up

again and again



consume whatever

life throws your way

let grace possess you

remain calm, rational

even under attack

courage is grace under fire



in spite of consequences

you can only be

a victim of yourself

not others

discipline your mind

be tenacious, persevere

hope always remains

 

© 2016 Michael D Emmerich

New Medical Writings

Feeling very proud; I have been approached by a Canadian based medical site to submit articles for publication. They are a Pan-Access worldwide collective of experts and non-experts creating a discussion about infection control and prevention using their  online publication forum, http://www.InfectionControl.tips

Check out my profile and my first article cleared for publication (working on the next few)

http://infectioncontrol.tips/author/memmerich/

Managing Infection Control in a Disaster

TECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE

TECHNOLOGY IN MEDICINE

Past, Present and a Possible Future – Help or Hinder

Published in Sanguine, journal of the ECSSA June 2015

Technology in Medicine, a topic many in EMS chat about, and if we have been in service for 20 years plus, we have then been privileged (or cursed) to see significant changes across the board with regard to equipment, patient care, protocols and drug therapies. Many of us have actively pushed for change and new equipment; be it with regard to fluid therapy, bleeding control, pain management and airway management. As one who has been active in certain areas pushing for change, we sometimes miss the most crucial approach to patient care; neatly summed up by Hippocrates (400-ish BC)

Cure Sometimes. Treat Often. Comfort Always

The classic approach to patient care has always been underpinned by the following:

  • Arrive at a diagnosis by patient consultation and physical hands on examination

  • Confirm ones diagnosis via various diagnostic devices

  • Reaffirm ones diagnosis by means of special investigations

Will technology change this approach for better or the worse?

If we look back at history, we see that not all new technologies have been readily accepted by the medical community. Many were viewed (are viewed) with suspicion. In the 1930’s some doctors doubted an X-ray image of the chest was as reliable as a physical examination. Devices threatened to replace the diagnostic expertise of the traditional doctor. Many doctors have valued their clinical experience over machine-produced information. Other technologies initially failed because doctors or patients found them impractical. The ECG was only useful when it became portable and reliable enough to be used at the patient’s bedside.

We need to also seriously review our progress in Medical Technology with regard to changes that offer only incremental benefits but at much higher patient care cost. The focus must be on evidence-based product development, manufacturers have to be able to show their products and new technologies will add value to their customers. Does new technology automatically translate into better patient care and most importantly improved patient outcomes.Plus we need to ask the question; who is their customer, the patient or the medical practitioner? If we as practitioners treat our patients as customers, they will act like customers, we need to be very careful of venturing into a quagmire such as this.

The entire patient/medical practitioner relationship is also changing, as the patient has access to a wider range of medical information, our patients are possibly smarter (maybe). Patients have access to more medical information, with the end result, that at times, they might be less trusting and prone to ask more questions of their medical practitioner. As practitioners we must be open to this new questioning patient and be willing to answer more questions than we did in the past.

Taking cognisance of all of the above: what is the health care practitioner to do?

There is an acknowledged gap in the “bench to bedside” cycle of medical discovery and its implementation in clinical practice, which can mean a gap of years changing “what we know to what we practice”.Hence the treatment of patients in an emergency setting should not only be concentrated on developing new technologies, but must also involve proper training and skills development; medical talents needs to be honed. New technologies MUST always mandate new skill sets, protocols and procedures.

An area of import in my opinion in medical development is patient information. The more information we have on the patient at hand, will allow us to render more appropriate patient care. Information and knowledge management is critical in helping with the decision making process and thereby improving patient care. Many medical practitioners believe that patients should take an active role in managing their own health information, because it fosters personal responsibility and ownership and enables both the patient and practitioner to track progress outside scheduled appointments and at times of a medical emergency. Patient smart cards is one way to grapple with this issue of information. It will allow patients to upload their health records via a flash drive and carry their information with them in their wallet. Information may be accessed through cloud-based storage and encrypted systems anywhere in the world, or plugged into medical smart readers. Medical practitioners can update to cloud technology in real time and the patients own medical doctor can be alerted to changes in the cloud files.

Another key area where technology can aid us in having more information at our fingertips is via a “differential” diagnosis or problem list, which is accessed via the cloud and links to our patient file and further information we input. After we have reviewed the patient “history” and examination. (e.g. is this appendicitis? a urinary tract infection? constipation? inflammatory bowel disease?) The practitioner must then troll his memory banks and innate knowledge base, or one may need to consult texts/online sources to check up/confirm their thinking. Cloud based technology could aid us and speed up the confirmatory differential diagnosis. As their is no doubt much room for improvement in the current approach, with many practitioners currently relying on their tacit knowledge base at the frontline which, while mostly effective, is subject to human error. Once the differential diagnosis or problem list is drawn up, then a related treatment plan could be formulated, and treatments in the form of procedures and/or prescriptions for medications may be suggested by our cloud database.

Emergency Medicine must continue its current academic trajectory, to keep pace with the challenges that technology brings to our patient care. If academic training lags behind the technology curve our practitioners and therefore our patients will be the poorer. We must ensure that there is now technology/practitioner gap as we continue to push the boundaries in improving our patient care. The danger of technology, is that it has the ability to make us lazy and self reliant. It has become noticeable in certain areas of emergency medicine how our reliance on technology has allowed us to forget the three cornerstones of good medicine, diagnosis, confirmation and reaffirmation; of which the diagnosis and confirmation are reliant on us having a hands on approach to our patients (which is becoming a dying art). Good solid diagnostic skills will always be an essential tool of medicine, especially emergency medicine, we forget this at our and our patients peril.