Ambulance Today – Winter Edition 2018

The Winter Edition for 2018, has hit the shelves, its live now on Ambulance Today. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 65.

From the Africa Desk of Ambulance Today: I’m dreaming of a happy Christmas

Ambulance Today Winter Ed 2018 .pdf

Ambulance Today Winter Ed 2018 – Flip Digital

This magazines focus is on South America but even more importantly it is a memorial issue – sadly our Executive Editor and man behind Ambulance Today Declan Heneghan sadly passed away on the 28th of November.

IN MEMORIAM: DECLAN BRYAN DOMINIC HENEGHAN
(1965-2018)

 

There is so much to say about this edition and Declan, as he is Ambulance Today… read the messages of remembrance form across the globe … he will be sadly missed .

The article on Burnout: A silent threat in the prehospital care service (page 37) is close to my heart.

A fascinating analysis as to the contributing factors is offered. The more aware we are of the nature of our obstacles, the better equipped we are to either navigate or avoid them!”

To all the followers of this page, if you want to see an article written about any specific aspect of Emergency Care on the African continent, or get me to interview a key role player, drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you are enjoying this journey, as we continue to explore this fascinating continent. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate – Enjoy!

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Ambulance Today – Autumn Edition 2018

The Autumn Edition for 2018, has hit the shelves, its live now on Ambulance Today. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 41 & 42.

Clinical innovation and technology in medicine and its challenges in Africa

Ambulance Today Autumn Ed 2018 .pdf

Ambulance Today Autumn Ed 2018 – Flip Digital

The magazine’s focus is on technology in medicine:

CLINICAL INNOVATION SPECIAL: Are you getting the Right Dose of cutting-edge technology needed to improve your patient-care?

Within this Clinical Innovation Special you will find a special report from Nashville-based EMS Healthcare Solutions. One of their leading products, RightDose, offers a unique solution that takes the guesswork and calculation out of medication administration. Also well worth reading is the feature on renowned UK ambulance manufacturer, Cartwright Conversions, which highlights their continued commitment to clinical innovation within ambulance design with their very rapidly-growing and impressive range of clinically-based ambulance modifications. The article on “The use of Mechanical CPR Devices in a Pre-Hospital Setting” is a fascinating read .. amongst so many others in this edition.

To all the followers of this page, if you want to see an article written about any specific aspect of Emergency Care on the African continent, or get me to interview a key role player, drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you are enjoying this journey, as we continue to explore this fascinating continent. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate – Enjoy!

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EMS – The Cost ……

An EMS colleague of mine posted this picture the other day ….

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All I can can say … is that losing a patient takes away apart of you, you can never get back. I wrote an article on this entitled:

EMS – You Can Never Leave

For those who ask this question, to those of us who work in EMS … take a read … and ponder awhile, at the of the cost of care. To my colleagues who keep going back to do the same … thank you ….

Cover image courtesy of:  © 2011-2017 DanSun PhotoArt

 

Ambulance Today – Autumn Edition

The Autumn Edition has hit the shelves, its live now in Ambulance Today. Click on the link below to download and read the magazine and my article on page 37, An Introduction into the Aero-medical Evacuation Industry in Africa – ‘From the Africa Desk’ by the Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

Ambulance Today Autumn Edition 2017

To all the followers of this page, if you want to see an article written about any specific aspect of Emergency Care on the African continent, or get me to interview a key role player, drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website please make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you are enjoying the start of this journey, as we continue to explore this fascinating continent. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate.

Feeling Proud

Feeling very proud at present, I am embarking on another new writing adventure, I have been appointed as the Africa editor for the UK based EMS publication – Ambulance Today, circulation includes, Europe, Canada, the Pacific Rim and now Africa.

At Ambulance Today we are always looking to expand our ambulance news coverage to different parts of the globe, which is why we are proud to launch our new segment ‘From the Africa Desk’ and introduce our Africa Editor, Michael Emmerich.

The Africa Quarterly editorial, that I will be writing, will cover the main regions in Africa, with opinion pieces from various regional role players. Our focus will be on the key regions across the continent; East, West, Central, Sub Sahara and North Africa. I will explore key and relevant NGO’s and the vital role that they play in bringing medicine and emergency medicine to the continent. The first article will be in the Summer Edition (UK Summer), which is in the next week 🙂

To all the medical people who follow this page, if you have any ideas for special feature articles on ambulance care in any part of Africa drop me a mail. Equally, if you have any news items you would like  us to run either in our magazine or on our daily-updated global ambulance news website make contact.

To my fellow passionate EMS friends across the world, I trust you will walk this continent with me as we delve deeper into the respective regions in future articles. Till then be safe out there and stay passionate.

god is in session

wailing, screaming sirens

tear the night apart

screeching burnt rubber

scar the asphalt

as you deeply inhale and sigh

carbon, rubber and sweat

attack your senses

hands on the spinning steering wheel

thinking, planning, expecting

the unexpected

no plan survives initial contact

grabbing rushing pushing jostling

questions, answers

sobbing screaming crying

 ……. silence



gloved hands palpate poke prod

ears listen, eyes roam

instructions issued

 god is creating

and it will be good

skin exposed

clothes cut

working in blood and flesh

are gods tools

needles puncture

flashbacks appear

and reappear



machines beep

fast then faster

fluids chase in

smells assail your senses

burnt metal, blood, vomit

you drive them down

sweat drips off god

mixing with blood

god is in session

angels hover



pressure

applied and present

vials crack, needles puncture

….. skin

beep … beep …….. Beep

slower and slower

vocal chords visualised

the bag of life

is squeezed

continuously

rhythm of life is kept in balance

a refractory pause ensues

gloves changed, sweaty brows mopped

spectacles wiped clean of sweat

decisions discussions decisions



beeping changes

angels move closer

god intervenes

shoves them rudely aside

not today god says

not on my watch

© 2016 michael d emmerich

image courtesy of – Image © 2011-2017 DanSun PhotoArt

EMS – You Can Never Leave

Last thing I remember I was running for the door

I had to find the passage back to the place I was before

“Relax,” said the night man, “We are programmed to receive

You can check out any time you like but you can never leave”

EAGLES – Hotel California

EMS is like the Hotel California: “You can check out anytime you like… but you can never leave” the memories, faces, successes and failures will always be with us. They dim at times over the years, but they are always there. I read a thought provoking and honest analysis on being a paramedic a few months back and have been mulling over her post, digging through ramblings from my field journals and the skeleton of a story I have been working on for about 2 years… these all prompted me to ramble further…

The blog post that triggered this article is: Unless you’ve been there, you wouldn’t understand: A Paramedics farewell to the job. Posted on February 10, 2015 by Di McMath

https://dimcmath.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/unless-youve-been-there-you-wouldnt-understand-a-paramedics-farewell-to-the-job/

One of the key issues for me is the ability/or lack thereof to detach from what we are doing and seeing; this drags one into the massively dehumanising temptation of EMS. I do feel that this dehumanisation is both inexorable and dangerous – as practitioners we need to know how to halt or slow it down. After 30 years of emergency medicine practise; I am still not entirely sure if we can entirely halt the process, which is why we can never fully check-out.

Being a fan of the poetry of Wilfred Owen, and as I reread his poems on a regular basis, I was drawn back to his poems during this thought process and found some further insight on reading “Insensibility”:

And some cease feeling

Even themselves or for themselves

Dullness best solves

The tease and doubt

The poem plays along the interesting juxtaposed lines of detached versus involved, and the varied degrees of these mindsets. Those of us in the profession have over the years dabbled with both approaches, the trick is for each individual to find his/her own balance. That is all part of the process of slowing down the dehumanising process. Finding this balance is key, if we do not, then we are doomed to keep repeating the mistakes of our past (mistakes as regards emotions and those of a clinical nature).

Emergency Medicine has the ability to dehumanise and diminish or renew and expand our powers of feeling. It is our choice to decide which path to follow. We realise soon on in our profession that this is one of the many choices that we have to make. How we deal with this choice determines how we deal with another key critical decision we as practitioners in the field are confronted with at numerous times in our career. Who lives or dies, or why do some people die despite our best efforts; and the pain of admitting defeat and saying okay, we need to stop now, the patient is deceased.

It is on these crucial scenarios, that I have to agree with the title of Di’s blogpost:

Unless you have been there you wouldn’t understand – Its sounds trite, but it is so true.

Trying to explain this process of immediate Triage, that at times needs to be done in very short time frames, less than a minute, is very difficult. Those are some of the choices we can never walk away from, and even when we do make them we cannot stop thinking about “What If?” the curse and bane of every paramedic. The cursed ability to second guess yourself long after the fact on an ongoing basis. It is here where we as emergency medicine practitioners are faced with the dehumanising and diminishing or the renewing and expanding of mental and medical health.

The goal of our profession should be a living force in the quest for and prevention of human suffering, but that sometimes comes at the cost of our own mental health. As we enter, continue in and exit this amazing profession, lets consider the cost to those we have served and continue to serve. All we can do as practitioners is warn, and that is why the practitioner needs to be truthful.

Updated:

Read these 2 poems I wrote on the cost of service:

https://mikesnexus.com/2017/04/23/at-what-cost/

https://mikesnexus.com/2016/10/30/god-is-in-session/